Who is wearing spectacles = Adjective Clause qualifying the noun ‘gentleman. An adjective clause modifies the noun in the main clause and appears right after it in a sentence. (a) The tall gentleman is my father = Principal Clause. Note: We should be careful about the synchronization between the adjective clause and the main sentence. Adjective, adverb, and noun clauses contain a subject and a verb. An adjective clause is a multiword adjective that includes a subject and a verb. The tall gentleman who is wearing spectacles is my father. In reality, this is not the case, because this clause in … Who is wearing a blue shirt = Adjective Clause qualifying the noun ‘boy’. An Adjective Clause is introduced by a Relative Pronoun or by a Relative Adverb. Note that in some cases there are half sentences. It will always be a subordinate clause. An Adjective Clause qualifies a noun or a pronoun in the Principal Clause which goes before it. Adjective Clause An adjective clause is a multiword adjective that includes a subject and a verb. Also known as an adjectival clause or a relative clause . It appears immediately after the word it describes (modifies). The scooter which I bought yesterday has been stolen. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. However, it cannot stand alone as a complete thought. 3. An adjective clause that has a subject pronoun (which, that, or who) can also be shortened into an adjective phrase. An adjective clause is a clause that works to describe (modify) a noun or pronoun. “Adjective clause” or “relative clause” means a clause that acts as an adjective by qualifying a noun. Such clauses are known as Non-defining Relative Clauses. Adjective clause comes right after the name it generally describes, but sometimes other words can be entered between the defined name and adjective clause. (b) Who is wearing a blue shirt = Adjective Clause qualifying the noun ‘boy’. An Adjective Clause does the work of an Adjective. The clause, who are honest, clearly identifies or describes the servants, and, therefore, it is an Adjective Clause. Defining and Non-Defining Relative Clauses, Assessment of Speaking and Listening (ASL), English MCQ The Trees Objective quiz Class 10 Part – 1, English MCQ Poets and Pancakes Objective quiz Class 12 Part – 5, English MCQ Poets and Pancakes Objective quiz Class 12 Part – 4, English MCQ Poets and Pancakes Objective quiz Class 12 Part – 3, Adverb Clause Definition, Examples & Exercises. (a) The scooter has been stolen = Principal Clause. (a) The boy is my brother = Principal Clause. It can graphically be analysed as follows : 2. Simple examples and definition of Adverb Clause. He released the pigeon, which (= and it) flew away. Adjective Clauses, Definition and Examples, Adjectives, Comparatives and Superlatives, Definition and Examples, Adjectives That Start With D, Adjectives List, Comparative and Superlative Adjectives, Example Sentences, Opposite Of Happy, Antonyms of Happy, Meaning and Example Sentences, Opposite Of Permanent, Antonyms of Permanent, Meaning and Example Sentences, Opposite Of Cruel, Antonyms of Cruel, Meaning and Example Sentences, Opposite Of Rude, Antonyms of Rude, Meaning and Example Sentences, Opposite Of Little, Antonyms of Little, Meaning and Example Sentences. Clause definition, a syntactic construction containing a subject and predicate and forming part of a sentence or constituting a whole simple sentence. “Who” is used to describe people, “which” is used to describe animals and all inanimate beings. Its role … The whole statement modifies a noun or pronoun. The chocolates which you ate yesterday are the ones Daddy bought from Belgium. “Who, whom, that, which, whose, where, when, why” is used. An Adjective Clause performs the function of an adjective. The first sentence implies that the speaker has many brothers, one of them who is a professor has gone to England. Adjective Clause is not separated from the main sentence by commas. Note 2: The full sentence comes after where, when and why. For example: Today, I saw a blue car which was parked in front of my car. Here we are providing you with clauses definition, clauses meaning, and all types of clauses and some clauses examples with clauses exercises. An adjective clause is a type of dependent clause that acts as an adjective in the sentence. When we think of an adjective, we usually think about a single word used before a noun to modify its meanings (e.g., tall building, smelly cat, argumentative assistant).